English (ENGL)

ENGL A100 Expository Writing 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to English composition with special focus on grammar, paragraph structure, expository essay structure, and critical reading skills. This course is for students who are not yet qualified to take ENGL T122. Students are assigned to the course on the basis of a placement test administered by the English department.

ENGL A105 English Composition– International Students 3 crs.

This course involves intensive review of study skills, bilingual language problems, and composition for students who speak English as a second language and are not ready to take ENGL T122. Entrance is by English department placement test.

ENGL A205 Writing about Texts 3 crs.

This course is the introductory composition course for English majors and minors that provides training in the writing process. It covers rhetorical, argumentative, and representational dimensions of literary and non-literary texts (cf. ENGL A210).

Required of entering freshman majors and minors; other interested students must have permission of the departmental chair.

ENGL A206 Reading Poetry 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to the basic tools needed to read English and American poetry, including concepts of genre, form, metrics, figurative representation, and history.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A208 Writing from Sources 3 crs.

This course focuses on the research process, evaluation of sources, and in-depth writing assignments with emphasis on primary research.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205

ENGL A210 Texts and Theory 3 crs.

Texts and Theory applies contemporary theories of literary criticism to works of fiction, drama, and film. The course requires students to analyze their readings in frequent writing assignments using various critical approaches. It is recommended for English majors who place out of Writing about Texts (ENGL A205).

ENGL A211 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 crs.

The course is an introduction to writing fiction and poetry. Student writing will be discussed in a workshop format and in individual conferences with the instructor. Students will also read and discuss a wide range of contemporary fiction and poetry.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A212 Introduction to Major British Authors 3 crs.

This course is designed to treat works of literature as representative parts of the continuous evolution/growth of the English literary tradition. It introduces students to the works of major British authors from three contiguous modern or pre-modern historical periods.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A213 Survey of British Literature I 3 crs.

This course will introduce students to the first half of English literary history (from Chaucer to the late eighteenth century). By looking at how different literary forms and genres (poetry and prose, comedy and tragedy, romance and neoclassicism) interacted with changing social realities, we’ll explore the various uses of literature, how it was used both to explain a changing world and to resist those changes by building refuges from them.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A214 Survey of British Literature II 3 crs.

We'll begin our quest in 1789, the year Rousseau’s Confessions was published posthumously, one of the acknowledged beginnings of the Romantic Era. From there we’ll progress through over 200 years of literature, ending somewhere around 10 minutes ago. Our aim is breadth rather than depth, sampling works and writers in order to develop a flavor for each successive literary age. We’ll be reading a lot and enjoying it immensely. Much of what we read will be poetry (especially early on), sprinkled with a patina of other genres as they suit our needs.  

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A215 World Literature I 3 crs.

This course offers students an introduction to literature from around the world from the beginnings of written texts to 1650. Ancient Greece, early China, the Roman Empire, India’s classical age, the rise of Islamic literature, the cultural flowering of medieval Japan, African literary cultures, and the European Renaissance will be covered.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A216 World Literature II 3 crs.

This course focuses on the literature of the world from 1650 to the present. It highlights the Enlightenment in Europe; Asia’s movement into global dialogue; the Ottoman Empire; and African, American, and European revolutions in art, politics, and industry.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A220 Introduction to Film and Digital Media 3 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the means by which creative narratives are being re-interpreted through film and other digital media.

ENGL A242 Contemporary Nonfiction Prose 3 crs.

This course is a study of the more important examples of prose nonfiction written since 1920. The topics covered include autobiography, travel writing, and personal experience narratives.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A243 American Masterworks 3 crs.

A survey of American writers from the Colonial period to 1900, this course includes Bradford, Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Dickinson, and Twain. Several major texts–such as Walden, The Scarlet Letter, Moby Dick, and Huckleberry Finn–will be studied as well as extensive selections from other writers’ works.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A244 American Literature Since 1900 3 crs.

This course is a survey of American Literature from 1865 to the present. It will provide a chronological overview of American literature from the Civil War to the present. We will try to answer the following questions in order to understand both the literature and the culture that produced it: What constitutes literature and how does it change over time? What does it mean to call literature “American?” What social and cultural factors affect literature and how is it produced and understood? How do we choose what to read and what not to read?

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction 3 crs.

This course introduces the student to modern short fiction–that is, short stories and novellas written in the last hundred years. Modern short fiction begins with continental writers like Chekhov, so the emphasis is on authors writing in languages other than English.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A250 Introduction to African-American Literature 3 crs.

This course is a survey of African-American literature from the early slavery period through Emancipation and Reconstruction up to the late 1890s. We sample various genres, including poetry, speeches, fiction, essays, and biographies, and examine dominant themes, motifs, and styles characteristic of the period.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A251 African-American Literature Since 1900 3 crs.

A survey of modern African-American literature from 1900 to the present, this course broadly samples major writers, genres, and themes of 20th-century African-America. It provides a conceptual framework for this body of literature; reviews key terms, ideas, motifs, and individual styles; and evaluates the contributions of African-American writers to American literary culture.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A306 Professional Writing 3 crs.

This course trains students in the basic writing techniques required by the professional world.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A311 Writing Fiction 3 crs.

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing short fiction. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students will read widely and analyze short stories throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211 and/or permission of instructor.

ENGL A312 Writing Poetry 3 crs.

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing poetry. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students will read widely and analyze poems throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211 and/or permission of instructor.

ENGL A313 Feature Screenwriting I 3 crs.

This workshop-oriented writing course takes students through the study of classical and nonclassical feature scripts and asks students to develop a feature narrative concept through the stages of treatment and outline and to write half of the script itself.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211.

ENGL A314 Feature Screenwriting II 3 crs.

Designed as the second in a two-part sequence with ENGL A313, this workshop writing course asks students to complete their feature narrative screenplays while studying further examples of classical and nonclassical scripts. Students will also analyze and complete a rewrite of their scripts and study production potentials.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211, A313; junior standing.

ENGL A316 Medieval Literature 3 crs.

Covering material from Beowulf and Arthurian legend to drama and lyrics, this course provides an introduction not only to the masterworks of the period but also to the complex culture and world view that produced such divergent works as The Divine Comedy and The Art of Courtly Love.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A317 Writing the Short Script 3 crs.

Writing the Short Script will focus on monologues, dialogues and short scripts. Designed to strengthen the dialogue and blocking skills of students interested in writing fiction, nonfiction, screenplays and stage plays, the course will combine extensive readings of modern and contemporary literature with workshop discussions and individual conferences with the instructor about writing assignments.

ENGL A323 Renaissance Poetry 3 crs.

This course offers a consideration of the poetry of the major figures of the period–Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, and Marvell–but omits the longer works of Spenser and Milton.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A324 Early Shakespeare 3 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic and poetic works from Shakespeare's literary "apprenticeship" of the early 1590s to the turn of the seventeenth century. This course takes a close look at Shakespeare's language, studying both how it spoke uniquely to Renaissance auditors and how it continues to speak to us.  We will also situate Shakespeare's work in its dynamic context - the urban landscape of London, the popular (but still new) institution of public theatres, and a lively contest of ideas about politics, religion, and England's relationship to the wider world - while exploring the timeless questions it poses.

ENGL A325 Late Shakespeare 3 crs.

This course focuses mainly on Shakespeare's works after 1600.  Established by this time as a successful playwright and poet, Shakespeare continues to invent in new and even stranger ways during this second half of his career.  We will focus on language, exploring how Shakespeare's language becomes enigmatic over the course of his career, as well as the genres of tragedy and romance that he preferred during this time.  Further, we will situate Shakespeare's work in its broder artistic and cultural context by reading a play by his contemporaries Middleton and Rowley, and by considering topics like domesticity, national and international politics, romance, family dynamics, and ecology.

ENGL A330 Modern European Fiction in Translation 3 crs.

This course acts as an introduction to the modern European novel: that is, novels written since the publication of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary in 1857. Attention is given to the major writers in French, German, Russian, and Spanish. (European writers most notable for their shorter fiction are covered in ENGL A246, Modern Short Fiction.)

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A340 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales 3 crs.

This course is an examination of medieval culture, with special emphasis on art, philosophy, and religious and social codes as they are reflected in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A341 Chaucer: Dreams and Troilus 3 crs.

This course is an examination of medieval culture, with special emphasis on art, philosophy, and religious and social codes as they are reflected in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and the dream visions.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A344 A Survey of Modern Drama 3 crs.

An introduction to the major figures and works in modern Western drama, this course emphasizes those authors and plays that helped shape the development of drama as a cultural form. Primary stress will be placed on the literary aspects of the works, but considerable attention will be given to dramaturgical matters.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A348 Modern Poetry 3 crs.

This course surveys the major figures in England and America from Whitman to the beginning of World War II. Figures include Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Auden.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A349 20th-century American Fiction 3 crs.

This course examines the American novel from the 1920s to the present, and readings may include Stein, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A350 New Orleans in Literature 3 crs.

This course emphasizes the importance of place in literature by focusing on continuity and change in literary representations of New Orleans from the 1830s to the present. Readings include drama, poetry, and prose written by both residents and visitors.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A351 Louisiana Literature 3 crs.

This course is an exploration of the literary traditions of Louisiana, including works of fiction, drama and poetry that prominently feature the state, both past and present.

ENGL A355 Americans in Paris 3 crs.

The course covers the literature of the Lost Generation and the works of later writers who fled to Paris from repression in America. Studying the literature of the Lost Generation in the place where it was written and understanding the impact of Paris on the group of writers will help students understand the cultural symbiosis between America and France.

ENGL A360 Folklore and Literature 3 crs.

This course surveys such traditional, oral literature as legends, folk tales, and ballads.  It examines the uses of these genres and the representation of folk culture in poetry and fiction by selected writers from countries around the world.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A370 How to Read a Film 3 crs.

This course introduces students to reading films, gives some familiarity with film criticism, provides an introduction to the history of the cinema and to its development as an industry, and exposes students to a wide variety of films.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A372 Studies in American Cinema 3 crs.

Designed to explore the development of the classical Hollywood narrative film and its alternatives, the course focuses on aesthetic as well as sociocultural aspects of American film in relation to production, distribution, and consumption. The specific topic will change each term.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A373 The Black Writer in America 3 crs.

This course will survey the many contributions of African-American writers to the literary traditions of the United States. Those contributions are virtually contemporary with the colonization of North America--represented in the poetry of African-born Phyllis Wheatley--and shaped the themes and genres of American literature for the next three hundred years: from the slave narrative to local color fiction, from the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights movement. Writers will include familiar figures like Frederick Douglass, Richard Wright and Toni Morrison as well as lesser-known authors. We will also read a selection of non-fiction, by influential thinkers like W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Toni Morrison and James Baldwin.

ENGL A374 Holocaust in Literature and Film 3 crs.

This course will examine primary documents from victims, survivors, novelists and historians in order to understand the origins and consequences of Nazi genocide of Jews, Gypsies, Homosexuals, mentally ill and challenged and political dissidents.  The course will examine how the fim industry has influenced the way audiences view the Nazis rise to power, the laws pertaining to Jews and other minorities, and the final solution.  The course will also examine other genocides of the later 20th and early 21st centural to understand ethnic and religious animosities.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205

ENGL A388 How Language Works 3 crs.

This course is an advanced study of modern English grammar and linguistics, as well as the history of the language.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A394 Literature and Environment 3 crs.

This course explores the intersections of culture, ecology, and literary discourse.  In an effort to determine how particular narratives reflect, influence, and often define senses of place, space and region, this course considers representations of "environment" both in and as literary texts.  Works may include those from St. Augustine, Thomas Hariot, Charlotte Smith, Rachel Carson, Don Delillo, Edward Abbey, Anne Proulx, Ursula LeGuin, and Mike Tidwell.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A404 Creative Nonfiction Workshop 3 crs.

This course provides opportunity for peer critiques of writing projects of students’ own choosing. The course closely examines assumptions, style, and rhetorical techniques in writing for various purposes and audiences.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A405 Editing and Publishing 3 crs.

This course introduces the student writer to contemporary publishing and editing processes, with emphasis on an understanding of these as they affect both the creative writer and the writer of nonfiction.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A406 Internship: Editing and Publishing 3 crs.

This course introduces students to the production cycle of the New Orleans Review, an internationally known journal. Students work with print professionals on and off campus who cooperate to produce the magazine.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A408 Writing: Technique and Technology 3 crs.

This course introduces how current computer technology can be used to help the student develop as a mature writer. Students apply word processing to the classical tasks of revision, stylistic development, translation, and editing.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A409 Contemporary Topics in Rhetoric 3 crs.

This course examines significant trends in contemporary theories of rhetoric and the writing process. Special emphasis on how the theories relate to the teaching of composition at all grade levels.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A410 Writing Gender 3 crs.

The course examines the impact of contemporary feminist thought on rhetorical theory and introduces students to writing practices resulting from that impact. Readings from leading feminist theorists, critics and literary authors provide a foundation for nonfiction writing assignments that combine personal experience with critical theory and encourage experimentation with voice and form.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A411 Fiction Workshop 3 crs.

This course examines advanced topics in the writing of fiction, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. In addition to writing short fiction, students read extensively and analyze contemporary fiction.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211; junior standing.

ENGL A412 Poetry Workshop 3 crs.

The course examines advanced topics in the writing of poetry, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. In addition to writing poetry, students read extensively and analyze contemporary poetry.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211; junior standing.

ENGL A415 Creative Writing Workshop 3 crs.

This course examines advanced topics in creative writing to be determined by the instructor, with special attention to contemporary trends in creative writing. Some attention is paid to publication in the field. In addition to writing their own work, students read extensively and analyze examples relating to the topic. Repeatable with permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211 or permission of instructor.

ENGL A417 Playwriting Workshop 3 crs.

Employing a workshop format, the course examines the writing of plays as well as aspects of writing film scripts. In addition to writing dramatic exercises and plays, students read extensively and analyze examples of plays and films.  Students in the course will become more knowledgeable interpreters of drama and film, who are capable of writing comprehensive analyses and competently constructed examples of their own.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122, A205 or ENGL A210

ENGL A420 Tudor and Stuart Drama 3 crs.

Revenge. Despair. Shame. Madness.  Renaissance playwrights visited these (and related) themes with astonishing regularity as they fashioned a new form - the English tragedy - to entertain early modern audiences. Students enrolled in this course will situate the emergence of this form in the broader context of Tudor and Stuart drama.  Reading plays by Seneca, Kyd, Shakespeare, Heywood, Marlowe, Middleton, Jonson, Webster, and Cary, we will se how Renaissance dramatists engaged and expanded the literary conventions of classical tragedy and how they used the genre to confront the cultural problems of their day - including changing attitudes about religion, politics, and the role of the individual in a dynamic social landscape.  

ENGL A422 Studies in Renaissance Literature 3 crs.

This course charts the emergence of Renaissance empires and the concurrent rise of a modern discourse of racial difference.  We will read primary texts from English, continental, and early American literatures, representing a variety of genres: plays, poetry, fiction, sermons, essays, travel narratives, and political treatises.  We will read early colonial endeavors against the backdrops of England's rivalry with Spain, the growth of mercantile activity, and forms of religious dissent.  Secondary readings will include current critical and theoretical approaches, making this course excellent preparation for graduate study in literary and cultural fields.

ENGL A424 Medieval Drama 3 crs.

This course surveys Roman-style comedies, Latin liturgical drama and Anglo Norman religious plays in medieval England before turning to Middle English biblical, morality and saints' plays. Dramatic texts will be supplemented by non-dramatic literature. Music, theological writing, and visual materials and some emphasis will be placed on stagecraft.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A425 Restoration/ 18th-century Literature 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the major poets and prose writers of the Restoration and the 18th century with an emphasis on Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Boswell.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A426 18th-century British Fiction 3 crs.

This course is a study of the development of the novel in England through the French Revolution, with readings from Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A427 Romanticism 3 crs.

This course offers a consideration of the Romantic movement in English poetry, concentrating on Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A428 Victorian England 3 crs.

This course is a cultural and historical study of the age, with particular attention to Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, Carlyle, and Ruskin.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A429 19th-century British Fiction 3 crs.

A continuation of ENGL A426, this course examines the development of the novel in the 19th century with study of works of Austen, the Brontës, Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, and the minor novelists.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A430 20th-century British Fiction 3 crs.

A continuation of ENGL A426 and A429, this course examines the fiction of writers such as Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf with some attention given to contemporary fiction.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A431 Revising American Texts 3 crs.

"Why should we not also enjoy an original relation to the universe?" asks Emerson, and that original relation is revealed in the examination of pre-20th-century American literature in the light of 20th-century texts and films. The course creates a double vision of early and modern writing and film that broadens understanding of both eras and sheds light on what is truly original in the American experience.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A432 American Dreams 1620 — 1860 3 crs.

This course is an examination of how traditional American writers saw America emerging and how native Americans, African-Americans, women, and other minorities viewed the country’s development. The contrast calls into question all of our myths about the American Dream–as new Eden, as fountainhead of democracy and freedom, as a world of rugged individualism, innocence, and rags to riches.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A433 19th-century American Fiction 3 crs.

The American novel from the Romantics to the Naturalists will be examined; readings include Poe, Melville, Hawthorne, Twain, James, Crane, and Dreiser.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A434 American Romanticism 3 crs.

The course re-examines two major 19th-century movements in American literature, Romanticism and Transcendentalism, in order to understand how they influenced and were influenced by Americans’ perceptions of race, class, and gender. The course focuses on literary and philosophical works in the light of deconstructionist and gender criticism to consider the varied approaches to defining America.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A437 American War Literature 3 crs.

This course is an examination of the impact of two world wars and the Vietnam conflict on the culture, politics, and literature of the U.S. The course will analyze war fronts and home fronts in order to aid students in understanding the images of wars and the impact of each conflict on later wars.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A438 Southern Literature 3 crs.

This course is a consideration of regionalism in literature. It examines the influence of such topics as history, race, and economic development on 19th- and 20th-century Southern writers.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A439 American Drama 3 crs.

This course is a study of American drama, including plays by O’Neill and Miller as well as more recent playwrights.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A450 Black Aesthetics 3 crs.

This course focuses on selected works by black writers from Africa, the U.S., and the Caribbean. It examines critical works and articles on black literary aesthetics and makes a comparative study of themes, motifs, structure, characterization, language, and style to establish the characteristics which confer a definite identity on black literary works.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A461 Contemporary Women's Literature 3 crs.

The course introduces the major works by women writers that heavily influenced the development of the modernist and postmodernist movements in literature. The course also explores the relationship of gender identity to the development of various literary techniques.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A466 Southern Women Writers 3 crs.

This course explores the contributions of women writers to the southern mystique, their achievements as artists, and the complex relationships they shared with each other and with their traditional culture.

ENGL A470 Film and the Art of Literary Adaptation 3 crs.

This course provides students with an understanding of how a work of literature is translated into a movie. The core material for the course is an analysis of fiction works that have been made into movies, but the course also deals with films created from folklore and historical records.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A472 Studies in European Cinema 3 crs.

This course explores European cinemas, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, in relation to the individual cultures from which they arise. Aesthetic and sociocultural differences between these national cinemas and Hollywood are stressed. The specific topic changes each term.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A475 Great Figures– Medieval 3 crs.

This course is an intensive study of one or two great medieval literary figures. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A476 Great Figures– Renaissance 3 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great literary figures from the Renaissance. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A478 Great Figures– 19th-century 3 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great literary figures from the 19th century. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A479 Great Figures– American Pre—1900 3 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great American literary figures of the pre-1900s. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A484 Critical Theory to 1900 3 crs.

This course is a historical survey of the major theories of literary interpretation, focusing on the aesthetics of major philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, Saint Augustine, Locke, Hume, Croce, and Nietzsche. In addition, the course will cover the theories of major western writers such as Horace, Sidney, Dryden, Pope, Johnson, Wordsworth, Keats, Arnold, Goethe, and Schiller. It concludes with a discussion of Freud, Marx, and Engels.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A485 Interpretive Approaches 3 crs.

This course looks at the more recent developments in interpretive theory, as it has been influenced by such concepts as formalism, mythography, phenomenology, structuralism, Marxism, Freudianism, and New Criticism.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A487 Contemporary Critical Issues 3 crs.

Under this heading, various courses will be offered that focus on different contemporary issues in literary criticism and theory.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A490 Great Figures 3 crs.

This course is an intensive study of one or two great literary figures. It traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. Repeatable with permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A491 Practicum in Teaching Writing 1 cr.

This practicum focuses on methods and materials for teaching writing. Students work in the English writing lab and the Writing across the Curriculum lab.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; permission of instructor.

ENGL A493 Directed Readings 3 crs.

ENGL A495 Special Project credits vary

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students.

ENGL A496 Seminar/Workshop credits vary

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

ENGL A497 Internship/ Practicum credits vary

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

ENGL A499 Independent Study credits vary

This course includes work leading to the English Honors thesis or the University Honors senior thesis, as well as work done independently under professorial supervision.

ENGL H233 Honors Literature I: Classic Epic 3 crs.

University Honors Program

Gilgamesh, Beowulf, and The Song of Roland establish the idea of the epic as a high artistic expression of a culture. The Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid are studied in the light of this concept.

ENGL H235 Great Love Stories 3 crs.

University Honors Program

This course examines the literature of love from several centuries and several continents. It focuses attention on cultural notions of love, marriage, family, romance, gender and sexuality.

ENGL T122 Critical Reading and Writing 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course gives intensive training in English composition. It is designed to develop the students’ ability to analyze arguments, create their own arguments, and conduct research.

ENGL T125 Writing About Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course explores the theme of initiation, or the emerging self, in a number of its literary forms. Most, though not all, of the tales are modern, realistic, and concerned with young adults in a pluralistic society. The narratives will confirm or challenge the experience of young people and may foreshadow images of their future lives.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U230 Renaissance Masterworks 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course examines major works of great European authors from the period 1350 — 1650 to give a sense of what constitutes the Renaissance. A series of important related themes will be traced in order to elucidate the Renaissance system of values: individual and community, permanence and change, illusion and reality, art and nature.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U232 Visions of Utopia 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

Utopia is the possible vision of an impossible world (i.e., the best of all possible worlds). To contemplate utopia as an idea, criticize it as a literary form, and participate in it as a means of aesthetic appreciation will be the purposes of the course.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

 ENGL U287 Martyrs, Minstrels, Mystics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course introduces a vast body of literary and non-literary writings produced by women from Western Europe and Japan during the period 900-1500. Genres to be studied include drama, romance, diary, lyric, epistle, mystical narrative and political allegory. Students will explore issues of authority, patronage and gender, among others.

ENGL U288 The World of the Vikings 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

The World of the Vikings examines literature of the Viking period and examines its impact on Early English Literature.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U289 Chaucer and His World 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is an examination of medieval culture, with special emphasis on art, philosophy, and the religious and social codes of the period as they are reflected in the work and thought of one of the great Western writers.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U295 The Legend of Robin Hood 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is an examination of the medieval origins and subsequent transmutations of Robin Hood, the medieval greenwood outlaw. The course will include 20th-century film adaptations of the legend, and emphasis will be on viewing the Robin Hood story from a number of different critical perspectives.

ENGL U297 Heroes and Monsters 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course offers a multidisciplinary introduction to early medieval literature, history and archaeology. Students will explore Anglo-Saxon attitudes toward heroism, lordship, the gods and God, space and time, gender, and death as preparation for a month-long reading of the Old English epic Beawulf.

ENGL U299 Arthurian Legend 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is a survey of Arthurian literature and art from the Middle Ages to the present, tracing the growth of the legend from early 10th-century chronicles through the romances of the high Middle Ages and its eventual evolution to such contemporary works as the film Excalibur or the feminist novel The Mists of Avalon.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V234 Literature and Justice 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

Much excellent literature has been produced by men and women reacting to wrongs inflicted upon them by society. Excellent literature has also been written showing the "Failure of the Word"–how the legal justice system has blocked rather than achieved justice.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V244 Screen Power 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course aims to introduce students to an analytical model dealing with the ideological power of film with respect to its aesthetics, content, and audience appeal. Recent studies argue that film is not ideologically free and that any serious study of film history, aesthetics, or criticism should take this into account. This course may be taken more than once as the subject matter changes.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V250 Myth and Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course focuses on the relationship between myth and literary narrative. It explores the function of myth and examines literary texts in the light of recurrent patterns of culture. Readings from anthropology, psychology, and comparative religion will offer a framework for the consideration of literary texts, including fiction, poetry, and drama.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V256 Regional American Writers 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is a study of the North American sense of place from nineteenth century local color fiction to contemporary literatres of diversity.

ENGL V259 Romantic Words/Pictures 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

A study of Romantic verbal and visual imagery, emphasizing the issues and values at stake in debates over the 18th- and 19th-century sister arts tradition in England. Poetry by Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, and others. Paintings by Constable, Turner, and others. Readings in Burke, Lessing, Reynolds, and others.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V260 Detective Fiction 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course examines detective fictions within the context of British and American literary traditions from the mid-nineteenth century forward. Lectures, discussions and writing assignments focus on the evolution of the genre from the puzzles of Poe and Conan Doyle through the British Golden Age and the American "hard boiled" school to contemporary and post modern forms.

ENGL V269 Multicultural Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is in literature dealing with cross-cultural themes and experiences. It will include, but not be limited to, literature of colonial and post-colonial experience. Its purpose is to create a greater awareness of how representations of other people, places, and cultures function in our personal and communal lives.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V270 The American Character 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course concerns those characteristics of American culture that seem to define America as unique among nations. It will concentrate on contemporary American values and politics but will begin with the observations of de Tocqueville and include the writings of contemporary journalists, social scientists, novelists, travel writers, and foreign observers.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V273 The African Novel 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course examines the form and texture of the African novel and looks at the dominant themes of colonization, assimilation, alienation, and neo-colonialism, with the aim of determining the role of the African novel in teaching the world about Africa.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V274 Women Writers 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is a historical study of literature focusing upon women’s struggle for equality. Readings include fiction, drama, poetry, and biography by and about women, and historical, sociological, and psychological essays.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V275 Black Women Novelists 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course focuses on black women as creative literary artists and evaluates the contributions of these women to the literary culture of their respective countries and to the world in general. It seeks to establish the common links and the divergent views of these writers on problems facing black people wherever they live.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V276 Literary Modernism 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

Modernism is a term that has come to include not only the styles of late 19th- and early 20th-century art and literature but also the philosophic and moral issues represented in these art forms. This course examines major 20th-century works of art and literature and the issues of modern life raised by these works. (Also listed as VISA V140.)

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V277 Harlem Renaissance 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course focuses on the first major African-American literary and cultural movement of the 20th century. In addition to familiarizing the student with the literary and cultural background out of which the Harlem Renaissance developed, the course covers the major writers of the movement with emphasis on their relationship to the artists of the jazz era.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V278 Black Thought and Art 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is a survey of major themes, genres, and motifs in black literature of Africa, the U.S., and the Caribbean. It explores the religious, historical, sociopolitical, and cultural ideals of black people. It evaluates the role of black writers in projecting the contributions of black people to the world of culture and civilization.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V280 Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course surveys the major science fiction/fantasy themes and forms in an effort to assess their relevance to our complex postmodern society. The values discussed and the issues raised by this study should help the student better grasp the individual’s role in our contemporary technological world.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V281 The Literature of Nature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

Humans' encounter with nature has produced some of the most lasting literature in the world. This course examines texts from early to contemporary nature writers, such as John James Audubon to John McPhee and Terry Tempest Williams. Students will also study and practice the craft of Nature writing.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V285 Contemporary Catholic Writers 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course examines issues of Catholic faith and practice as explored in major works of literature and film produced since Vatican II by artists from the U.S. and from around the world.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V289 Vampires in Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course will cover different legends, texts, and films that deal with vampire myths.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V292 The Sixties Through Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course examines America during one of its most exciting and idealistic periods–through the literature of the civil rights movement, the anti-war movement, the counterculture movement, and the women’s movement–in order to understand the values, assumptions, and conflicts of the decade.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.